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DAYS 25-28 ......................................................................................................................................................... FROM LEES FERRY TO NEARLY TO CEDAR RIDGE

Friday, July 1, 2016

Butch Cassidy - Circleville (Day 14)

Butch Cassidy's boyhood home (artist - H Bullock)

September 15, 1884 - Junction to Circle Valley (Circleville) - nooned - then nearly through Canyon 

Day 14 of 44 (Week 3)  
Junction to "nearly through canyon" = 20 Miles (Total Miles = 271 Miles)
Total Trip Average Miles Per Day = 19.4 Miles: Average Miles Per Day - Week 3 = 10 Miles


September 14 - 15, 1884
September 15 - 16, 1884



















Original Journal Entry
"Monday Sep. 15 we started - forded the river - Bought some grain at the County seat of Piute Co., - drove to the mouth of the canyon turned out the horses in the grain fields that the hail had beaten out in Circle Valley.  The people in Circle Valley lost about 7000 bu. of grain by the hail storm.  Hitched up drove nearly through the canyon -  traveled about 20 miles."

Final Journal Entry
"Sep. 15 forded the river - bought some grain at the county seat of Piute County. Nooned at mouth of canyon. A hail storm had beaten out about 7000 bushels of grain.  Drove nearly through canyon by night traveled 20 miles."

The Andersons drove to the mouth of the canyon and turned out their horses (canyon behind Circleville sign).  This sign was close to where Leroy Parker (Butch Cassidy) had grown up.  He left home in 1884, the same year the Anderson family passed through the area.  An interesting fact is that Butch Cassidy was in the Apache County jail in St. Johns under the name of James Lowe from March 27, 1900 to March 31, 1900. (Butch Cassidy, My Uncle, pg. 135)  Andrew "Gus" Gibbons and Frank LeSueur were shot the same day Butch Cassidy went to jail.  Butch Cassidy was not involved in the shooting.

Circleville, Piute County
Butch Cassidy's boyhood home just over the line of
Piute county in Garfield county


Butch Cassidy helped his mother plant these Poplar
trees (right)  behind the shed
(Butch Cassidy, My Uncle, by W. J. Betenson (pg. 42-43) 




Butch Cassidy home near Circleville
The Andersons drove here "to the mouth of the canyon (in back) turned out the horses."

Butch Cassidy became a legend - perhaps you remember the 1969 film





Seems like everything in this area is named for Butch Cassidy

Red Canyon


 Circleville





















 6 things  (click) you may not know about Butch Cassidy


 Circleville






















"Nooned at mouth of canyon.   Drove nearly through the canyon" to camp

Close to the camping area - "nearly through the canyon"

 Note: Highway post 149 is about 18 miles from the Co-op where they Anderson Family camped in Panguitch (Highway post 131).  Coming South from the Harris Ranch would put them at Highway post 147 (20 miles from Highway post167. Due to rounding, slightly different routes back then, and mostly because the town of Junction was located likely where the lake is today, there is a difference in the mileage.  I believe they took a more round about route than today from Junction which added mileage so 149 is about right. 






















The Andersons will be about a third through their trip when they arrive at the Co-op in Panguitch tomorrow.  But where was the Co-op?  I asked this question several times before I finally found an answer.  Find out how. Near the "Co-op," we will take a walk through the park and discover an amazing story. It is told in a mini movie and worth repeating to your children and grandchildren. There is a family connection on the Adair (Richey/Sherwood) side of our family in the movie! The next blog will also introduce you to somebody you will hear about in later postings. The Carters have several connections to Panguitch.  They will find out about them in the same place where I found out about the Co-op. 

What does a quilt have to do with the next posting?

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1 comment:

  1. It looks so peaceful living out there like that. Part of me would love to live out like that if someone could guarantee there would be no snakes.

    ReplyDelete